Tattoo Artist Magazine

How Tattoo Machines Could be Key to Treating Disfiguring Facial Sores and Even Curing Skin Cancer

By Tom Blackwell  www.news.nationalpost.com [caption id="21372" align="aligncenter" width="620"]Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors A tattoo machine can target Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle.[/caption] Mention tattooing and health in the same sentence, and chances are the topic is one of the nasty infectious diseases — from HIV to Hep C — that can be transmitted by dirty needles. A new Canadian study, though, may be about to change that image, suggesting that tattooing equipment could actually be an effective new way to combat an array of skin conditions, penetrating deep enough to deliver drugs to the right cells, but not so far that the needle prods sensitive nerves.

"It’s logical that it works…. But we were amazed"

The just-published research found evidence that tattooing could greatly improve treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a parasite that leaves millions of people worldwide with disfiguring, and often emotionally devastating, facial sores. It affects mainly developing countries, but even Canadian soldiers returning from Afghanistan have contracted the illness. The technology, though, could eventually have application in treating skin cancer, psoriasis and other ailments, speculates the scientist behind the project. [caption id="21373" align="aligncenter" width="620"]Sand-Fly Skin Disease Besets Afghanistan An Afghan receives treatment for a tropical skin disease. The Afghan capital, Kabul, has one of the highest concentrations of the disfiguring skin disease, Cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a parasitic disease transmitted by the phlebotomine sand fly. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 104492714[/caption] “We were extremely excited, very surprised [at the success of the experiment],” said Anny Fortin, a biochemist who did the work at McGill University. “If you think about it, it’s logical that it works.… But we were amazed.” She cautioned that the initial study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, was conducted on mice, so there is no guarantee the results will translate into humans. The next step is further drug-tattooing work on pigs, whose skin is closer to that of people, and then to try the technique on humans if the animal research is successful. [caption id="21374" align="aligncenter" width="620"]Key West Lifts Ban On Tattoo Parlors A tattoo artist works on a tattoo.[/caption] Ms. Fortin said she came up with the idea after talking to a colleague who works for a company that makes tattooing equipment for applying permanent makeup. She obtained funding to explore the novel idea from Grand Challenges Canada — a federally funded agency that finances research on affordable innovations to attack health threats in poor countries. Leishmaniasis, it turns out, is ripe for some kind of new approach. Caused by a parasite that sand flies transmit, the most dangerous form attacks internal organs and can be fatal. The more common cutaneous version will not kill, but leaves patients with stigma-inducing ulcers on their faces, sometimes making it difficult for them to find a spouse or otherwise affecting their lives deeply. An estimated 1.5 million new cases are recorded yearly. NA0817_TattooFullGraphic_C_MF None of the current treatment options are ideal. One drug can be administered systemically, but the intramuscular injections — one a day for a month — are toxic and painful. Hypodermics are also used to deliver the same drug directly into the lesion, also extremely painful. “I’ve seen children being treated, six people were needed to immobilize the child and this little kid was screaming like crazy,” said Ms. Fortin. The tattooing machine targets Leishmania cells just below the surface of the sore, depositing the drug — instead of ink — into the bottom of the little holes it creates, far less painfully than a hypodermic needle. Ironically, it acts in much the same way as the fly injects the parasite when it bites someone, said Ms. Fortin. Her study compared treatment of ulcers in mice using the tattooing gear, versus the intramuscular injections, and a topical ointment applied on the ulcer. The tattoo method was the most effective in all cases, clearing up the lesions completely, the study reported. It is possible the heat generated by the tattooing also helps, triggering inflammation that brings immune cells to attack the pathogen, said Prof. Uzonna. Ms. Fortin said she is now trying to obtain another round of Grand Challenges funding, which would require her to find matching grants from other sources.

20 Great Female Tattoo Artists in History Tattooing Over 20 Years

By Dawn Cooke In honor of women’s history month I have compiled a list of women in the history of tattooing. This is not a complete history by any means. There are hundreds of women throughout time who have contributed to the art form and trade of tattooing. Unfortunately a lot of them have gone unaccounted for.  I have tried to find some of the lesser-known women to highlight here however some of the well-known artists have also been included. I have included women with at least 20 years under their belts. I was overwhelmed with the response to my idea to write this article. Some of the women earlier on in history who paved the way for us included several sideshow performers. Betty Broadbent and lady Viola are among the most well known. In the 1930’s Mildred Hull was one of the few women tattoo artists working on the bowery in NY.  The beloved Cindy Ray from Australia, tattooed into the year 2007. These ladies have set our roots and our history is being made as we speak. But here are 20 women, most of whom are tattooing still, who deserve recognition for their contributions! These women tattooed long before social media and Reality television. They may not be masters at social media but they are masters of their craft. Take the time too look into these great artists! (In no particular order.) 1.Madame Chinchilla http://triangletattoo.com chinchilla 2.Loretta Lue http://leufamilyiron.com 3.Pat Fish http://www.luckyfish.com pat fish 4.Madame Lazonga http://www.madamelazongastattoo.com 5. Suzanne Fauser (R.I.P) http://studiotattoo.com 6. Debbie Lenz https://www.facebook.com/debbie.lenz.5 debbie lenz 7. Kim Saigh http://www.kimsaigh.com kimsaigh 8. Juli Moon http://julimoon.com 9. Ms. Mikki http://fortunetattoopdx.com ms.mikki 10. Jacci Gresham https://www.facebook.com/jacci.gresham 11.Annette Larue http://annettelarue.com 12. Junii Salmon http://diamondclubtattoo.com junii Salmon 13. Judy Parker http://www.judyparker.org 14. Deb Yarian http://eaglerivertattoo.com debyarian copy 15. Kari Barba http://outerlimitstattoo.com Kari Barba 16.Cindy Stroemple http://www.tattoofaction.com/CindysArt.html Cindy Stroemple 17. Ms. Deborah/Sofia Estrella http://www.fountainofyouthtattoo.com IMG_96ms.deborah76 18. Deborah Brody https://www.facebook.com/lovenhatetattoo deborah brody 19. Pat Sinatra http://www.patstats.com Pat sinatra 20. Patty Kelley http://www.avalontattoo.com Most of us women in tattooing recognize that one of our weakest points is that we don’t band together the same way that men do. I am hoping we can change that buy supporting each other, both men and women. There was a time when women didn't get much recognition in tattooing. Still many women who started tattooing before the information boom have been over shadowed by more tech-savi newcomers. Until recently there is very little record of female contributions to this craft and still so many ladies are left out. Lets not ever forget the ladies who came before us. The worth of a person should not be measured by what’s between their legs. A smart man I know said, “Our differences define us, not divide us.” But since women overall are not often treated equally, with equal pay and equal opportunities, not everyone has that perspective. Our ideals as a society of gender roles is very out dated at this point because we all have equal access to information. We can’t forget that historically this was not the case. Fortunately, things are evolving. We have so much to benefit from in learning from one another. The future I see includes men and women supporting and promoting each other as time goes on in tattooing. Where the work is valued independent from the gender of the artist. Some day generations from now people will look back and wonder how it was possible that women were ever so excluded. Cheers to these 20 women who were brave and talented enough to pioneer this trade at a time when it wasn’t so easy for anyone. When information was limited, the ability to promote your work was scarce, some of your peers were less than supportive, and there were few women in the business, your love of the craft kept you going. Your contributions are meaningful.

Heartbeat Ink with Jondix

Photos and Interview by Ino Mei

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Jondix spoke exclusively to HeartbeatInk Tattoo Magazine about his initiation into tattooing, his past as a tattoo nerd, the first tattoo he ever did; at Tas Danazoglou's neck, his experience in Greece while been Mike the Athens'apprentice and the issue of copying in Dotwork, which he characterizes as “embarrassing”. What is your actual name? How did the name Jondix come up and what does it mean? My name is Jondix, that's who I am. Before Jondix, I was another person. My “baptism” made me the human I am now. During one of the art reunions I used to attend with my friends Ciruelo Cabral, Eva Blank, Heinrich and others, this name came up as a joke, but a year later when Ciruelo published a new book, he used it in the credits and I thought it was a sign and that's how it started to affect me and change my mind in a more artistic way than before.

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Where you working as an architect in the past? When did you first come into contact with tattoos and how did you get involved with tattooing? I never worked as an architect. in fact I didn't even finish the university. After seven years I kinda quit… I needed money and I was into parties and guitars and Harleys and all the typical Mediterranean excess… I saw the first tattoos as a child on people from the army…badly done you know… and then in Boston I saw a good tattoo, a death reaper from Spider Web Tattoo and wanted it immediately. So at eighteen I started getting tattoos, like Steve Vai's autograph and some stupid biomechs until Tas Danazoglou came to Barcelona and saved me… Is it true that you were “discovered” by Tas Danazoglou? How did you meet him? He came to a Barcelona Tattoo Convention and then stayed at the LTW tattoo shop in Barcelona for some years. I got many tattoos from him and we became friends. I was a tattoo nerd already, buying magazines and stuff… I got my first tattoo when I was eighteen, that's twenty three years ago. There we no tattoo shops in Barcelona like there are today. I was going to tattoo conventions abroad just as a fan and even buying machines just for decoration purposes. Nobody did this in Barcelona, not even the established tattooists. So I knew who Tas was and I knew who Mike the Athens was from “Tattoo Planet” magazine and I wanted to get their more spiritual tattoos, as opposed to the trendy shiny stuff. Then one day on my birthday Tas came home and I played him “Resurrection” by Halford and he in return he showed me how to set up a machine and do a tattoo… and I ended up tattooing a bit on his neck that night…

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To read this full article, visit: http://heartbeatink.gr/en/columns-features/artists-studios-columns-features/jondix/#!prettyPhoto[]/0/

Recap: A Fitting Farewell to Tattoo Legend Mike Bakaty at the Bowery Electric

By Allison

Source: www.boweryboogie.com

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The Bowery really was electric on Friday evening, standing amongst a crowd of family and friends honoring an inspirational man: Mike Bakaty, who passed away at the end of January. It was a farewell (nay, celebration) to a tattoo legend, hosted at his favorite neighborhood bar, Bowery Electric, and attended by friends and loved ones. Even some biker buddies from DC were in attendance.

We stood to raise a glass, to cheers, to find the silver lining in his passing, or as Bakaty dubbed it, the”upshot.” We spoke from the heart, we embraced, we laughed and we cried because this man – a pioneer in the world of tattooing and an icon on the Lower East Side – is no longer with us.

One of Mike’s sons – Mehai Bakaty stood with two of his brothers and spoke resounding words to an audience bound by one man.

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Here is Mehai’s soulful speech and some pictures from the event.

 
https://soundcloud.com/boweryboogie/at-mike-bakatys-memorial-at

“They say you’re not really dead until the last person has spoken your name so I think our goal is to let that be a while before that actually happens.”

Mike, we have your voice, your laughter, your wisdom for all to hear, and of course, our memories. It will be a while.

The upshot is you will always be with us.

Pastor Has to Pay Up After Joking Offer to Fund Congregation’s Tattoos

By Charlene Sakoda Source: www.news.yahoo.com http://news.yahoo.com/video/pastor-pay-joking-offer-fund-213023876.html Pastor Zack Zehnder, from The Cross Mount Dora church in Mount Dora, Florida has made good on an offhand promise to pay for his congregation members’ tattoos. As reported by WOFL Fox 35 News, in his recent sermon about acceptance, the pastor said, “If anybody would like to go out and get a tattoo of the logo of the cross that we have for this church we will find money and pay for that.” It was something that Zehnder said he mentioned “flippantly,” without actually thinking anyone would collect on the pledge. Jeremie Turner is a congregation members who was excited by the proposition, “We definitely took him up on his offer because if he’s going to hand out free tattoos, he’s got a crowd that’s going to accept them.” WOFL reported that at least a dozen church members have taken advantage of the deal and went to Bill Gold’s Tattoo Shop to get inked. “If I wasn’t so dang sarcastic in my sermons, I don’t know that we would be here,” said Pastor Zehnder. “But we got some crazy people that have said they wanted to do it so I kinda gotta, I made the promise. I kinda gotta back it up.” The pastor hopes that the church members’ new ink will serve as a conversation starter about religion. “People’s perception of church has probably never been as negative as it is today and so if we can do something to kind of flip that script and interact with them and do something in a unique and creative way, we’re going to do that.” The Cross Mount Dora member, Holly Stratton told the station, “I think that we’re in a different time and a different place now and I think it’s wonderful that we think outside the box a little bit.” William Trigg admitted that churches and tattoos don’t usually go together, saying, “Wouldn’t really expect, a little unorthodox for a church, but you know…leave it to anybody, Zack would be the one to do it.” Zehnder isn’t the only church leader to make the unexpected connection between church and the body art. Jamie Bertolini, a senior pastor at Greer MillChurch in South Carolina, is also the owner of Trinity Tattoo Company. Bertolini told the Spartanburg Herald-Journal that one of the reasons he invested in the tattoo shop was because it would be an, “…absolutely wonderful opportunity to share the love of Jesus Christ.” Another church leader and tattoo fan is ordained minister, Eddie Smith of Oklahoma. He’s been tattooing for over 20 years and opened Sacred by Design in December 2010. He’s hardly fits the stereotypical idea of a minister, with his sleeves and distinct facial tattoos. In 2013, there was an even more literal side-by-side connection between a church and the art of tattooing. LifeQuest Church in Missouri held a fund raising raffle for members to get tattooed on stage during a sermon by Senior Pastor Chris Pinion. As for The Cross Mount Dora congregation, in the end Pastor Zach Zehnder was happy about his unintentional comment saying, “I think it’s pretty neat that these guys are going to be walking out of here with a testimony and a chance to share God’s story with people that maybe I never would or maybe you never would, that don’t have tattoos.”

TATTOO HISTORY MYTHS EXPOSED

By Marisa Kakoulas Source: www.needlesandsins.com

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Last week, Gizmodo, which is primarily a tech blog, attempted to condense tattoo history, from mummies to Miami Ink, in their blog post "How the Art of Tattoo Has Colored World History." In what seemed to be research primarily conducted on Wikipedia, the author ended up perpetuating many of the myths and misinformation that float around online.  So I hit up true experts in the field of tattoo history to set the record straight: Dr. Matt LodderDr. Anna Felicity Friedman, and Dr. Lars Krutak.

So, you can take a minute and read the Gizmodo article first. Or not. I first asked Anna what she thought were some glaring mistakes in the post. Here's what she said: ANNA:  By the third sentence of this "article" I knew it was going to be a doozy. The problem with this statement, "That tradition continues today, just with a much smaller chance of infection" is a) it's incredibly melodramatic and b) it's just not true. Many (if not most?) traditional tattoo practitioners were acutely aware of the possibility of infection, one of the reasons why we perhaps see suspension mediums in traditional tattoo "ink" recipes like alium juice or even one of my favorite rare ones, human breastmilk, both of which contain natural antibacterial agents. Rest periods for people having undergone tattooing are common cross-culturally (presumably to let the body heal and lessen the chance of infection). And with the rise of "tattoo parties" and so much home-tattooing by amateurs untrained in proper safe practices with bloodborne pathogens, there is a huge risk of all sorts of infections in the contemporary era. Re: the image of the "Pict" "tattoos": had the writer just done a tiny bit of searching re: this image, he might have realized this image is a fantasy and does not represent tattoos. Scholars are still not sure if the descriptions of body art on the Picts were tattoos or just body painting (leaning toward the latter), but they definitely were not 16th century French-inspired floral designs in multi-color (they were described as woad-like, which is blueish in color). The image is also not attributed to the source, and I'm guessing when the owner (Yale University) finds out it's been used without attribution, they will have it pulled.  Here are some links to some of my posts on one of the other images from the same book (John White's equally fantastic Pict images), which mention fantasy and have more elucidation of some of these problems: Image 1 (below), Image 2, and Image 3.

tattooed Pict

Matt also noted the misinformation on Picts and cited "The Pictish Tattoo: Origins of a Myth" by Richard Dibon-Smith for reference. As for the "These days, it's not just sailors and ruffians that get inked" line (and the whole paragraph really), read Matt's attack on tattoo cliches.

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Above: Lars Krutak with one of the last tattooed Kalinga warriors Jaime Alos outside of Tabuk, Philippines. I'm also grateful for the extensive critique of the article that Lars offered: LARS: Otzi is not the oldest evidence as this article seems to purport. The oldest is a 7000-year-old male mummy of the Chinchorro culture of South America and this man wears a tattooed mustache on his upper-lip, so the earliest evidence is cosmetic. [Actually, the cited Smithsonian article had several glaring errors and I never cite it - period! - even though I work at the Smithsonian! Dr. Fletcher stated that Otzi is the oldest tattoo evidence, but she is no doubt incorrect and I like mythbusting this oft-stated "fact."] Gizmodo: The Inuit, for example, have been tattooing themselves in the name of beauty and a peaceful afterlife since at least the 13th century. LARS - The earliest evidence of tattooing in all of North America is a Palaeo-Eskimo ivory maskette from Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada whose face is completely covered with tattoos and it dates to -3500 BP. This object most likely represents a woman. So the practice is much older than the author presumes. For "beauty" is pretty much horseshit - see my comments below. Much circumpolar tattooing aimed to repel the advances of disease-bearing evil spirits and there were multiple forms of medicinal tattooing to relieve painful rheumatism (a la the Iceman), painful swellings, facial paralysis, and even to increase the production of a woman's breast milk. Gizmodo: Similarly, in the the [sic] Cree tribe, men would often tattoo their entire bodies while the women would wear ornate designs running from mid-torso to pelvis as protective wards for a safe pregnancy. LARS: I have never heard anything about safe pregnancies in relation to Cree tattoo, although I am aware of tattoos in other parts of North America to promote fertility or ensure that the first thing a newborn saw was a thing of beauty (eg, inner thigh tattoo, Inuit region). Indeed, Cree men (Plains Cree, Wood Cree) were tattooed on their torso, but only for war honors. These tattoos had to be earned so only successful warriors would have worn such tattoos. The author makes it sounds like every man had them, but this is simply not true.

To read this full article, go to: http://www.needlesandsins.com/2014/03/tattoo-history-myths-exposed.html

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